Oktober 2016 -Januari 2017
Kings County Hospital

Artist in residence, Beautiful Distress, New York, USA

PAST
April 2016
Discovery Award 2016

‘Blue Hour’ got shortlisted for the LOOP Discovery Award.

29 November 2015 - 24 Januari 2016
Blue Hour

Bradwolff projects, Amsterdam, NL

'Blue Hour' is a collaboration with Merel Karhof

25th of April 2015
award

'Play within a play' has won the 'Honorable Mention Award' in the Experimental Short Competition at Nashville Film Festival (USA)

16 - 25 April 2015
Nashville Film Festival

Nashville, USA

'Play within a play'

21 - 30 December 2014
Donna E Liberta

Associazionne Culturale, Rome, IT

'Eye'

11 - 16 november 2014
Braunschweig International Film Festival

Braunschweig, DE

'Play within a play'

2 november 2014
Museumnacht - CineSonic

EYE, Amsterdam, NL

14 oktober 2014
uitkijk goes short

De UItkijk, Amsterdam, NL

17 July 2014
FEMINA

nternational Women's Film Festival, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

'Play within a play'

29 March - 27 April 2014
Inner space/Outer space

Sign, Groningen, NL

'Inner Space/Outer Space'
Part of tour BNG Workspace project award 2012

11 February 2014
Best of the Fest: korte films van het International Film Festival Rotterdam

EYE, Amsterdam, NL

25 January 2014
Filmfestival rotterdam

Shorts 2014, Filmfestival Rotterdam, NL

22 September - 17 November 2013
KadS 2013

'Inner Space/Outer Space'
Part of tour BNG Workspace project award 2012

17 August 2013
HELD FESTIVAL
27 July 2013
WINNER OF SCREENGRAB NEW MEDIA ARTS AWARD
27 July - 14 August 2013
SCREENGRAB NEW MEDIA ART EXHIBITION

School of Creative Art’s eMerge Gallery, Australia

'Vessel'
Collaboration with Jasper van den Brink

15 February 2013 - 7 April 2013
14th VIDEONALE

Premiere video installation 'Vessel'. 'Vessel' is a collaboration with video artist Jasper van den Brink

2 December 2012 - 20 June 2013
PEOPLE CAN ONLY DEAL WITH FANTASY WHEN THEY ARE READY FOR IT. THE PAVILJOENS 2001-2012

Museum de Paviljoens, Almere

'Eye'

Play within a play
Hans den Hartog Jager

Sometimes beauty reveals itself in the most unexpected places. It could be in a cup of coffee, for example, or in the room of a girl in a yellow dress. It’s in your own mind. Yasmijn Karhof’s short film ‘Play within a play’ begins with a reflection of the moon, although we cannot see what it is reflected in. Strange sounds like the chirping of crickets are audible in the background, and somewhere we hear the rattle of crockery. A train rumbles by; the moon begins to turn and swirl, finally breaking up into shimmering patches of light no less beautiful than the original image. By this point the presumed reality has slipped from our grasp. Is this a lake? A night sky? It is not until the camera zooms out that the moment of disillusion strikes. We see only a table bearing a cup (Arabia, dark blue) of coffee in which an electric light (a simple, bare bulb) is reflected. A dark man in a royal blue shirt picks up a coffee spoon, and you can’t help thinking leave the moon alone! Don’t stir the coffee! Please don’t drink it! The nonexistent moon has clearly found a place in our hearts. It has a vulnerable beauty to which we are now attached. Pleading is in vain: the man stirs and drinks the coffee.
Karhof’s ‘Play within a play’, a triptych, is full of paradoxes like this. Where does reality end and the imagination begin? How vulnerable do you become when you succumb to beauty? Fascinatingly, it is not only the spectator who faces these questions; the characters in the film are unmistakably struggling with them too. The longer and more often you watch the film the clearer it becomes that, for the dark man and for the red-haired woman who appears in parts two and three, reality and imagination are tightly interwoven. The effect is especially striking in the crucial image of part two, when we see the woman for the first time. She is sitting on the (sky blue) floor of a room, clad in a wide-falling, bright yellow dress (the sun!), alongside a small sheepskin rug (a fleecy cloud) and a book that lies open at a photo of a flying seagull. It is a splendid image, literally heavenly, and it is hard to believe that this is not partly due to the woman’s total preoccupation with the almost lava-like shimmering in the bowl of miso soup which she holds. Once again, we are forced to wonder whose perception prevails: is it that of the woman, of the filmmaker or of yourself?
There is no answer to that, but who needs one? The image is too beautiful for that. Beauty is the prominent quality of this film (which could equally have been titled ‘Play within a play Within a Play’). Karhof constantly diverts everyone – the viewer as well as the characters – between varying ideas and feelings, until no one can recall where he or she stands. What is real here? And if it is no longer real, what is it then? It grows increasingly clear as we watch the film that the fluctuating emotions could drive the two protagonists apart, so compelling us to think about the inherent potency of beauty. In this respect, ‘Play within a play’ offers us a powerful hint of the sublime, of the idea that beauty can exert a power so imposing and overwhelming that it eludes the grasp of the human mind. Perhaps that is what really happens with Karhof’s characters. Beauty is, for them, both an intensification of reality and a retreat from it. But can it bring them together despite all? When you have watched ‘Play within a play’, you realize that beauty can destroy as well as unite. That is the true intensity of what you have experienced.

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